Design Awards Celebration

2022 Award Winners

Congratulations to the winners of the 2022 AIA Baltimore and BAF Excellence in Design Awards.

The program recognizes excellence in architectural design by AIA Baltimore members and AIA members with projects in AIA Baltimore’s region, and contributions to architecture and its understanding in Baltimore through the BAF Golden Griffin and Roger D. Redden Awards.

Built and unbuilt projects submitted by AIA members were judged by a distinguished jury of AIA architects, this year based in East Bay, California.

2022 Grand Design Award Winner
2022 Excellence in Design Winner, Excellence in Sustainability

Benjamin Banneker Academic High School
Perkins Eastman Architects

Benjamin Banneker Academic High School is the highest-performing public school in DC. Serving students who are typically the first in their families to attend college, the school places great emphasis on creating a collegiate ambiance that supports high levels of achievement, while also helping to mitigate stress on these young scholars.

Accordingly, the new building is designed to foster its strong culture, provide state-of-the-art labs and instructional spaces, and create a “collegiate ambiance” that will provide a transitional environment to the next step in a life of inspired learning. To create this ambiance, the Learning Commons—a dynamic and collaborative evolution of the library—functions as the literal and figurative heart of the school. Every level of this vertical, four-story campus engages this inspiring space, providing formal and informal places to gather, socialize, and collaborate. As it stacks through the central atrium, it integrates all of the program spaces on every level by providing centrally located, open, and collaborative spaces for study, socialization, and collaboration. This allows it to become a beacon of natural light into an otherwise deep building footprint. Skylights suffuse each level with natural light and generous interior glazing in adjacent instructional spaces allows natural light to supplement daylight from exterior windows, enhancing the learning environment.

The Learning Commons culminates in “Skyplace,” an open-air roof terrace with views to the Washington Monument and across the city that honors Benjamin Banneker’s achievements as an astronomer and his key role in establishing the plan for Washington. By honoring the school’s namesake, an African-American polymath who acquired great knowledge and skill despite the constraints imposed by an 18th-century society, “Skyplace” inspires today’s students while also providing a place for respite, renewal, and perspective.

The building’s varied massing respects its historic neighbors and creates a balanced streetscape within its residential context. As the site is also a valued community open space, several existing and cherished features, including a dog park and a skate park, have been integrated to create a campus that is truly the center of its community.

The animated façade—through its fenestration and shading strategies and visible photovoltaic panels—manifests the approaches that will help establish the building as a new standard for a healthy, high-performance place to learn. Having benchmarked the school’s prior building on numerous Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) factors, the team leveraged a Net Zero Energy (NZE) design process to create an environment that not only conserves resources, but also enhances the performance of the environment—including daylight, acoustics, thermal comfort, and indoor air quality— that we know foster enhanced educational outcomes.

The building is paired with another school, concurrently designed, also targeting NZE and expected to generate surplus to allocate to Banneker if necessary. This multi-site approach jumps scales from a single building to the District’s entire inventory, encouraging a citywide approach to radical energy conservation.

Owner: DC Department of General Services; Associate Architect: Perkins Eastman Architects: Sean O’Donnell, Omar Calderon Santiago, Mary Rankin, Juan Guarin, Heather Jaregui, Ann Neeriemer, Miranda Ford; Associate Architect: Moody Nolan; General Contractor: MCN Build; Landscape Architect: Bradley Site Design, Inc.; Civil Engineer: Bowman Consulting DC; Structural Engineer: SK&A DC | Structural Engineers; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: CMTA; Photographer: Copyright Joseph Romeo; Plumbing and Fire Protection: Engenium Group; Low Voltage Consultant: Innovative Systems Design & Training, Inc. dba Educational Systems Planning; Acoustics: Polysonics; Food Service: Nyikos-Garcia Food Service Design Inc.; Sustainability Consultant: Perkins Eastman Architects.

Michael F. Trostel, FAIA, Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation

Thomas Jefferson Memorial
GWWO, Inc.

 

 

After a 10-year period during which a dark biofilm grew on the dome of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial, the exterior has now been returned to its original gleaming white appearance through a series of restorations and repairs. In addition, the structure has a new, watertight roofing system and stabilized masonry.

The project began in 2016 when the design team was contracted to evaluate the Thomas Jefferson Memorial and outline a project program for the restoration of the dome, portico, and flat roofs. The scope included surveying and documenting existing conditions at the flat and portico roofs as well as examining the structural, plumbing, electrical, and conservation issues at those same locations and in the attic. The team also diagnosed several water infiltration problems that lead to structural elements behind the masonry rusting and failing; these problems most notably lead to a large piece of stone falling on the portico in 2014.

With a widely varied set of existing conditions to address, the design team developed full construction documents to replace more than 10,000 square feet of non-historic roofing at the flat roofs; remove, clean, and reinstall the marble portico roof tiles over new waterproofing, stabilize, repair, and clean over 30,000 square feet of marble elements including the dome, parapets, and entablature; clean and stabilize the limestone at the portico and colonnade ceilings; and install new drainage systems at roofs to prevent future water damage. Conservation techniques specified included laser cleaning for the removal of biofilm, microabrasion for staining at the marble, blind pin repairs to stabilize cracked masonry, and replication of historic limestone ceiling elements where compromised units were removed at the portico. General construction activities included removal of tar waterproofing over the concrete substrate at the portico roof, installation of liquid-applied roofing membrane, installation of a membrane roof over tapered insulation at the flat roofs, repair of existing drains, installation of new drains, repair of the lightning protection system, and installation of new security features.

Construction began in late 2018 and continued through 2021 presenting technical challenges for both the design team, contractor, and National Park Service. Through close collaboration and creative problem-solving, the result is a fully restored exterior befitting of a national monument.

Client: National Park Service – National Mall and Memorial Parks; Architect: GWWO, Inc.: John Gregg, AIA, VMA, LEED AP; Lindsay McCook, AIA, LEED AP BD+C; Brian Weisgerber, AIA; Andrew Towne, AIA, LEED AP; General Contractor: Grunley Construction; Structural Engineer: Simpson Gumpertz & Heger, Inc.; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Henry Adams, LLC.; Photographers: Ulf Wallin Photography; National Park Service, Victoria Stauffenberg; Matt Flores; GWWO Architects; Consultant: Forella Group; VHB; GHD.

2022 Excellence in Design Detail

Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart Student Center
Hord Coplan Macht

 

 

Stone Ridge is a preK-12 all-girls independent school dedicated to the 5 tenets of Faith, Intellect, Social Action, Community and Growth. Originally conceived of as a new performing and visual arts center to encourage creativity on campus, the project evolved into much more.

After intensive initial collaboration with community stakeholders and revisiting the school’s masterplan the SLC was charged with bringing together all aspects of student life- academic, religious, social, individual, and community- in a single place on campus to enrich student life and creativity.

In addition, it was intended to establish a new framework for the growth of the campus that knits together all previous buildings and outdoor spaces. The building brings together in one place all aspects of student life to develop the whole student.

Client: Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart; Architect: Hord Coplan Macht: Paul R. Lund, Chan Byun, Pete Blum, Jenine Kotob, Andrea Swiatocha, Maureen Wiechert, Leah Wettstein, Eliza Beth Engle, Jill Popowich; General Contractor: Gilbane Construction Company; Civil Engineer: Soletz Engineering; Structural Engineer: Linton Engineering; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Interface Engineering; ©Judy Davis, Architectural Photographer; Theater & Performing Arts: MVPA; Acoustics & AV: Miller Beam & Paganelli; Food Services : Nyikos; Sustainability: Lorax; Graphics – Hord Coplan Macht.

2022 Excellence in Design Awards Winner

Johns Hopkins University O’Connor Center for Recreation & Well-Being
GWWO, Inc.

 

A comprehensive renovation and addition reimagined the Ralph S. O’Conner Center for Recreation & Well-Being, the primary facility for fitness programs, recreational sports, and experiential education activities on the Johns Hopkins University Homewood Campus. The project simultaneously enhances the cardio, weightlifting, and flexible program spaces of the center while giving new emphasis to social interaction and wellness. The design creates innovative opportunities for meeting, gathering, and viewing through new experiences of space, light, and nature, based on a holistic conception of health that integrates social, mental, and physical well-being.

The addition’s curtain wall and zinc-clad angled form complements the foursquare red brick heritage that dominates on campus while it also confirms the dynamic image of the University with architecture that is contextual, alive, and connective to actively contribute to the unity and vitality of the campus environment. Wrapping around the east and north sides of the old gymnasium, the addition increases the interior space by 30,000 SF.

Openness and connectivity are the governing principles of the design. The main entrance on the north façade presents a modern identity towards the campus’s North Gate and features expanses of glazing over two levels and a long floating porch canopy. ADA-accessible ramps, stairs, terraced seating, and a stormwater-fed rain garden lead to the entry. Along the building’s east face, a wide walking path creates a social corridor that runs alongside the wooded Bufano Sculpture Garden. As students, faculty, and passersby walk along the north and east façades of the center, one can see into the bustle and feel the excitement within the main program spaces. These views provide initial connections to the life within the building conveying the center’s energy to the University community.

Inside, passive and active spaces interact with one another and with the outdoors by means of views and access. The entrance is at the middle, track-level floor and is open to the floors above and below. In the lobby, one is immediately presented with options to access the new and upgraded wellness services, flow through and into athletic spaces, or pause for social interaction in the café. A new central stair links all three-floor levels of the building.

The new program’s north and east orientations allow visitors stunning views of the verdant and serene forest garden—whether one is lifting weights, shifting into warrior pose, or simply moving through the building, the sense of well-being is heightened. On the lower level, the original gymnasium is now light-filled, as are the program, cardio, and weight rooms on the upper floors. The skylit central stair with broad landings is a point of orientation for the whole building and provides places to pause and meet. It also opens to views of the cardio, fitness, and program rooms, to activate interest and social connection across program boundaries.

Owner: Johns Hopkins University; Architect: GWWO, Inc.: Alan Reed, Robert Allen, Andrew Towne, John Gregg, Jon Leo, Danielle Peters, Kevin Miller, Ted Watson, Tarisha Dolyniuk, Andrew Filarski, Timothy Belanger, Olga Pushkar, Janice Lee, Timothy Lai, Ayesha Moghal, Johnathan Chan, Nathan Dykstra, Monica Leung, Dhruv Soni, Troy Wright, Mike Stofko; Design Architect: MJMA Architecture & Design; General Contractor: Gilbane; Landscape Architect: Mahan Rykiel Associates; Civil Engineer: Rummell Klepper & Kahl Consulting Engineers; Structural Engineer: Columbia Engineering; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: James Posey Associates, Inc.; Tom Holdsworth Photography; Consultants: SpeXsys, Forella Group, Ashton Design.

2022 Excellence in Design Awards Winner

Howard County Circuit Courthouse
HOK

 

The Howard County Circuit Courthouse creates a modern expression of justice through the application of architecture, planning and programming. Built on a 30-acre brownfield site, the building replaces a 175-year-old facility that could no longer meet today’s user and technology needs.

The design recognizes the role courthouses serve as civic spaces. The stone and glass building references the materiality of historic courthouses while treating visitors to serene views of nature. The building’s planning preserved all existing trees and added 100 more to the site. An adjacent parking garage opens the surrounding grounds for use as public plazas, art installations, native habitat and renewable energy. An on-site solar field was designed to supply the building with over 50 percent of its energy needs.

The courthouse’s interior prioritizes health, well-being and safety. Its spaces are clearly organized, filled with light, and welcoming. Security measures are addressed in a double-height entry pavilion that frees the building’s central atrium to serve as public space. The four-story atrium’s clear views help orient visitors by directing them to services and functions throughout the building. An intricate network of exterior fins minimize heat gain, control glare and cast intriguing patterns of light and shadows on the interior’s circulation paths.

Each of the building’s 12 courtrooms can be accessed directly from main corridors, a simple but powerful organization that helps the public feel more comfortable in the space. The plan also includes office space and a courtroom for a sixth judge as well as a large and comfortable jury assembly area with views to the nearby woods.

The courthouse represents Howard County’s largest capital project ever and its first public-private partnership (P3) project. Built during the pandemic, the project was completed on time and on budget.

Client: Howard County; Architect: HOK: Duncan Kirk, Erin Ezell, Stephen Beacham, Yang Jiao, Nita Tuvesson; General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC.; Landscape Architect: HOK; Civil Engineer: Site Resources, Inc.; Structural Engineer: Cagley & Associates; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Wiley Wilson; © Alan Karchmer Photography; Consultant: IT/AV/Security: S2N Technology Group.

2022 Excellence in Design Award Winner

Graham Center for Innovation and Collaboration
Murphy & Dittenhafer Architects

 

In early 2018, after the successful completion of a Feasibility Study and Programming Analysis along with multiple Concept Designs, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) York campus determined that their new “pavilion” fostering innovation and leadership – now known as the Graham Center for Innovation and Collaboration – would be constructed on a previously unoccupied hillside site on the growing west end of campus. The idea for the Graham Center began with Donald C. Graham, a York entrepreneur and philanthropist, who desired to create a facility on Penn State’s York campus dedicated to promoting innovative and collaborative pursuits among students, faculty, and local business leaders. Importantly, this new facility would become the new home for the Graham Fellows Program for Entrepreneurial Leadership at Penn State York. As such, this building would need to provide flexible, non-traditional spaces to accommodate corporate-sponsored events, speaker series, and “business startup challenges,” while offering more formal, static spaces for small-group meetings and mentoring. Visual transparency, contemporary materiality, and appropriately fitting into the context of the Penn State York campus were other design goals defined early on.

The siting of the new Graham Center was carefully explored, thoroughly vetted, and takes advantage of the inclined grade and opportunities for campus connections and walkways. The final selected siting also cohesively fits into the existing campus plan, allowing for easy accessibility and visibility from the main campus circulation path as well as the faculty and student parking lots. Additionally, the extensive glazing on both floors affords students wide vistas of the campus from the interior, while also “putting on display” the unique and collaborative activities taking place inside.

An aluminum panel system with a varied profile arrangement clads the building exterior as well as a brick veneer with a dark red wine color unique to the campus. This brick continues into select interior locations along with bright metallic tones, notably in the two-story elevator tower finished with a textured metallic laminate. Wood also provides warmth to the interior – white maple veneer panels finish the wall along the interior staircase, and a ceiling system comprised of adjoined wood panels is suspended above the main entrance lobby.

The Graham Center is nestled into the dramatically sloping terrain, exposing collaboration, instructional, and gathering spaces outward to the campus, and positioning small-group meeting spaces, staff offices, and support spaces inward toward the hillside. The plan on the upper/first floor is open horizontally, allowing for extensive natural lighting of the interior and complete panoramic views of the campus. Lounge/café-like areas with moveable chairs and tables are the norm – in conjunction with the ability to adapt areas as desired via a folding glass partition on the first floor. On both floors, 24/7 student use, engagement, and collaboration are encouraged.

The completed Graham Center for Innovation and Collaboration now stands as a physical representation of Penn State York’s commitment to connecting its campus directly with local businesses and entrepreneurs – and the local economy – certainly exemplifying that “Good Design = Good Business.”

Owner: The Pennsylvania State University; Architect: Murphy & Dittenhafer Architects: Frank E. Dittenhafer II, FAIA, LEED AP; Lisa H.B. Clemens; General Contractor: Lobar, Inc.; Landscape Architect: Floura Teeter Landscape Architects; Civil Engineer: James R. Holley & Associates; Structural Engineer: Baker, Ingram & Associates; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Barton Associates, Inc.; Photographer: Alain Jaramillo.

2022 Excellence in Design Award Winner

Montgomery College Student Affairs & Science Building
Ziger|Snead Architects

 

An aging 1970’s building in the heart of campus is transformed with an addition and renovation to provide a central connection between two quads and support interdisciplinary academic programs as well as much needed informal lounges for students on this commuter campus to study and connect between classes.

Beginning with a robust programming and feasibility study, the design team was challenged to phase the renovation and addition in a manner that would allow continued operation of a significant portion of the building. The resulting concept creates a vertical separation and focuses the 100,000-sf renovation and addition on the new quad side. Working within the constraints of the existing structural system, the efficiently organized building houses an interdisciplinary program including teaching laboratories, classrooms, offices, and informal learning spaces. The building’s three levels and the campus’ two main quads are connected through a central spine and main stair.

Responding to programmatic requirements for access to daylight and informed by the earth sciences and applied mathematics departments housed in the building, the architectural scheme evokes concepts of shifting tectonic plates. The addition is organized with long linear elements that define large programmatic spaces leaving spaces in between for commons and informal gathering. The landscape is an extension of this concept and connects two major academic quads with circulation through the building.

Two bars of program are separated to afford a maximized amount of internal space with access to natural light. High performance glazing, integrated sun shading, an energy-efficient mechanical system, and infrastructure for solar photovoltaics contribute to the building’s LEED Gold Certification.

Owner: Montgomery College; Architect: Ziger|Snead Architects: Steve Ziger, FAIA; Jonathan Lessem, AIA; Miharu Morimoto, AIA; Katie Zaeh, AIA; Jonas Risén, AIA; Sarah Chapin, AIA; General Contractor: Hess Construction; Landscape Architect: Core Studio Design; Civil Engineer: A. Morton Thomas; Structural Engineer: Silman; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: James Posey Associates; Karl Connolly Photography; GHD – Fire Protection / Life Safety; Convergent Technology Group – IT / AV / Acoustic; Schnabel – Geotechnical Engineering; Simpson Gumpertz Heger – Building Envelope; Forella Group – Cost Estimating.

2022 Honorable Mentions

Arrowwood
Design Collective, Inc.

 

Project Challenge

The design challenge was to turn a poorly defined suburban surface parking lot with 20’ of slope into a 294 unit mixed-income residential community defining strong urban edges. While the solution is a seemingly simple 5-7 story residential donut wrapping/concealing the garage, the ethos of “wellness by design” resulted in purposeful nuanced visual and physical connections between public/private and interior/exterior to maximize the health benefits of biophilic connectivity.

Scaling for Equity

The project’s 294-unit 5-7 story mid-rise scale eschews its costly high-rise neighbors for cost and material-efficient wood-over-podium construction, avoiding both architectural and socio-economic homogeneity in favor of a more dynamic built environment and a cost point preserving choices for a range of incomes and life stages. While counter to the original masterplan’s high-rise massing, this 5-7 story height results in idealized urban density across the block while maximizing tenant affordability and communal connectivity.

Blurring Public and Private Realm

Responding to the site’s physical setting across from the neighborhood’s social central green, the design embraces the American vernacular “front yard” and “front porch.” This “front yard” purposefully blurs the boundaries between public and private realm to foster chance and planned encounters, while the more formalized public wrap-around “front porch” becomes a stage for residents to connect with the greater community both actively and passively, enhancing social livability.

Programming for Wellness

The parti is organized along a visual axis connecting the “front yard” with the courtyard’s “four seasons” and “garden rooms”. The entry sequence purposefully pulls residents off axis, through a series of compressed thresholds with maker spaces, music, library, and lounges activating the front porch. Reuniting with the courtyard, the clubhouse’s salon and kitchen impart emotive biophilic responses with seamless connectivity with the courtyard’s unique “fountainscape”. Anchored by the central wellness/fitness center, this fountain both unites and defines a series of discreet active and passive spaces, hierarchically celebrating the wellness center as a central destination and spirit within the community.

The masterplan’s community pool 1 block away frees up the entire courtyard for 4-season use, allowing a myriad of wellness uses including tenant gardens and a multi-purpose meditative lawn for private, active, and social programming. The courtyard’s non-uniform massing allows for “found spaces”, promoting individual and small group seating for live, work, and play uses. Storm water quality and quantity management is cleverly integrated with the landscape to define discreet seating areas and provide privacy for adjacent units.

Designing for Biophilia

With the central courtyard defining the project’s genius loci, the team’s use of biophilic principles greatly enhanced connections to nature throughout the users’ experience. The sense of touch, smell, and sound permeate the users experience, whether in common areas, or private residences overlooking the inner court. Heavily native plant selections promote a return of native birds and insects, rebuilding habitat. Full-height moveable glass walls between the clubhouse and courtyard enhance a seamless living experience between inside and out, while wall to wall glazing in all common areas maximize connectivity to nature and community.

Client: LCOR; Architect: Design Collective, Inc.: Matt Herbert, Mike Goodwin, Nicolas Mansperger, Lisa Corrado, Jennifer McLaughlin, Anna Dennis, Tim Sullivan John Bernet, Ryan Kautz, Bronte Lake, Nicky Lubis, Buffy Stachorowski; General Contractor: Davis Construction, Landscape Architect: Design Collective, Inc.; Civil Engineer: Vika Incorporated; Structural Engineer: Cagley & Associates; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: EDG2; ©2021, Tom Holdsworth Photography; Design Collective, Inc. (Interior Design); The Lighting Practice (Lighting Design); Phoenix Noise & Vibration (Acoustics); Paladino & Company (Sustainability).

2022 Honorable Mentions, Excellence in Sustainability

Berks Nature The Rookery
GWWO, Inc.

 

 

Established in 1974, Berks Nature is the leading agent for environmental conservation in Berks County, Pennsylvania, offering leadership, direct action, expertise, land use planning, advocacy, research, and education programs in accordance with the natural, historic, social, economic, and technical needs of the region and local community.

Originally located in downtown Reading, Berks Nature sought to move its headquarters to Angelica Park, an urban community park, to allow the organization to fulfill its mission and embody the belief that nature is essential to our quality of life. Opening in 2017, the LEED Gold certified Nature Place was designed as a working example of conservation principles. Sited adjacent to an existing classroom building, orientation of the structure celebrates the environment, providing panoramic views of the surrounding wetlands, making a visual connection with the nearby Neversink Mountain, and maximizing daylighting. The new facility—complete with classrooms, conference rooms, offices, outdoor learning spaces, and nature play area—allowed the conservation organization to dramatically expand its programming and open a new nature preschool, which significantly increased regional awareness. By 2019, Berks Nature’s Eco-Camps—a mainstay of the organization—reached capacity and spatial constraints combined with inclement weather limited student field trips.

To welcome every child interested in nature, a new addition constructed over and adjacent to the original preschool building doubled the size of the existing campus while limiting site disturbance and preserving the pristine natural setting. Clad in reclaimed wood from Pennsylvania mushroom farms, the addition blends in and appears as a natural extension of the existing facility. Named the Rookery—a term for a colony of birds—the addition provides uniquely stunning views over the 100-acre park and features a new multipurpose room suitable for use as a classroom and community gathering and event space linked to a covered outdoor rooftop classroom by an operable glass wall. Below, a new breezeway, complete with wood-burning fireplace, overlooks the wetlands and provides additional flexible program space.

Designed to showcase sustainable principles that visitors can implement in their own homes, the addition features bird-friendly acid etched glazing, rain chains, rain barrels, sheep’s wool insulation, reclaimed and recycled materials, and daylight sensors. Interpretive signage and wall graphics located throughout help educate visitors on the site’s ecosystem and conservation principles. The new facility has allowed Berks Nature to increase and diversity its educational programming and enhance its service to the community.

Owner: Berks Nature; Architect: GWWO, Inc: Terry Squyres, AIA, LEED AP; Kate Scurlock, AIA; Kimmie Kim, Anthony McAllister, Kevin Miller; General Contractor: Burkey Corporation; Civil Engineer: Barry Isett & Associates; Structural Engineer: Ewing Cole; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Henry Adams; Tom Holdsworth Photography.

2022 Honorable Mentions

Hope Village
RM Sovich Architecture

 

CHALLENGE:

Extremely low income (ELI) working-class wages do not rise with increased rentals and property values. Further, inflation erodes a family’s living conditions even in times of relative stability.

Insufficient income and lack of affordable housing are the leading causes of homelessness. Homelessness disproportionately affects racial and ethnic minorities. After paying their rent and utilities, 75% of ELI households end up with less than half of their income to pay for necessities such as food, medicine, transportation, or childcare.

OUTCOME:

Hope Village is a unique proposition: a non-profit and commercial developer collaboration.

It is a privately funded community of thirteen fully-furnished, 400-square-foot, single-family homes with wraparound porches and side yards created for homeownership for working, extremely low-income people or families who have experienced homelessness. The commercial developer is covering the difference between the actual cost and the sales price ($25,000) to the future homeowners.

The project is 99.93% privately funded with .07% public funding via a Baltimore City Youth Fund Grant. In addition, the Non-profit has established a program with the University of Maryland to provide advice and guidance for each new homeowner for their first three years in their home.

Rather than utilize the 26 existing +/-576 SF lots, the team consolidated 26 lots into 13 lots, which allowed for a side yard for each new homeowner and an additional lot is a shared community garden.

The master planning process encompassed traditional architectural issues and included social issues, such as homeowner training and employment assistance. The planning extends a program of counseling and advice via the University of Maryland established for this project. As a result, the new homeowners will have the opportunity to build equity.

Owner: Heart’s Place Services / Christian Wilson and Pam Wilson—-Developer: 28 Walker / Jay Sapperstein; Initial Shipping Container Concept: ARQ / Jay Orr, AIA; Architect: RM Sovich Architecture:Randy M. Sovich,FAIA,  Fitsum Temelisso, AIA; Landscape: Sophie R. Maguire/ NDC; General Contractor: Iconic Builders / Brad Notaro; Civil Engineer: Kimley-Horn; Photographer: RM Sovich Architecture.

2022 Honorable Mentions

C&O Canal National Historic Park Headquarters
Ziger|Snead Architects

 

The headquarters of the C&O Canal Historic National Park is relocated from a remote site to anchor a historic canal town of western Maryland as a community asset within the central region of the 184-mile C&O Canal.

The new 22,000 sf headquarters serves both visitors and National Park Service staff with offices, meeting rooms, and visitor resources. Transforming a former industrial lumber mill site, the new structure is sited and organized to create a public plaza with views to the canal framed by historic storefronts along the town’s main street. The gabled form is influenced by local materials and proportions with a contemporary expression of a board and batten siding found throughout the area. The building’s mass is broken down into two main components, responding to the site’s topography and optimizing the relationships to the surrounding context. Deep entry canopies and generous site elements integrate the building and landscape with exposed stormwater management, core ten panels, and heavy timber benches.

Extending beyond the project site, the design enhances connection and accessibility to the interpretive historic landscape and extensive trail system. Generous parking is provided above the flood plain, with improved connections across the state highway main street and accessible paths to the Cushwa Basin, restored aqueduct, and towpaths below. The site becomes a destination for visitors and locals alike and communicates the National Park Service’s commitment to the sustainability of the canal, trails, basin, and community.

Owner: John Genakos, Maryland Economic Development Corp. / National Park Service; Architect: Ziger|Snead Architects: Steve Ziger, FAIA; Ann Powell, AIA; Michael Westrate, AIA; Claire Edelen, AIA; Katherine LePage, AIA; General Contractor: Davis Construction; Landscape Architect: Floura Teeter Landscape Architects; Civil Engineer: Whitney Bailey Cox Magnani; Structural Engineer: 1200 Architectural Engineers; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: James Posey Associates; Karl Connolly Photography; speXsys – Telecomm, Security & AV Design.

2022 Honorable Mentions

John Lewis Elementary School
Perkins Eastman Architects

 

John Lewis Elementary School was designed to be the first school in the District of Columbia to achieve Net Zero Energy (NZE). The project is also pursuing LEED for Schools Platinum and WELL certification, setting a new benchmark. Through these approaches, the environment has been crafted to enhance health and well-being, reduce life-cycle costs, and enhance user performance.

The project’s design principles focused on civic presence, community connectivity, and—most importantly—student experience and wellness to create a high-performance, 21st-century learning environment.

While the new building replaces an obsolete, brutalist, open-plan building, it also intentionally retained its best aspects—flexible space and ease of communication—while providing better adjacencies, daylighting, acoustics, security, and outdoor space in order to enhance wellness and building performance, with the ultimate goal to enhance educational outcomes.

The design emphasizes outdoor recreation and connections with the natural world, known to improve student health and academic achievement. The landscape design embeds natural systems with dynamic play and learning spaces to blur the walls of the classroom. A treasured place for the community, certain school amenities are accessible after-hours and on weekends.

The building reads inside and out as a series of intimate, child-scaled houses that foster collaboration and strong relationships inside and feel at home in the adjacent residential neighborhood. The school’s “civic presence” features a large photovoltaic array to inspire the entire community to embrace sustainable design.

The school honors its proximity to Rock Creek Park, DC’s most prominent park, through interior and exterior textures, materials, and environmental quality. This is prominently seen in the library, where discovery zones and reading nooks encourage learning, socialization, and engagement for all students, and a large-scale mural by a beloved local artist is the backdrop to a “treehouse” maker space.

A high-performance dashboard tracks the building’s energy consumption, showcases the building’s sustainability features, and links to the school’s curriculum to address topics such as Social and Environmental Justice, Climate Change, and Water Conservation. Through this interactive, online dashboard, students and teachers can continuously discover how they interact with the building, and how the building and campus in turn influence and are influenced by the larger environment. The students’ on-going exploration of performance is complemented by comprehensive Pre- and Post-Occupancy Evaluations. As the building approaches one year of occupancy, the POE will engage students, faculty, and administrators as well as use on-site measurements to assess the success of the design.

The building is paired with another school, concurrently designed, that is also targeting NZE. The excess energy expected to be generated at John Lewis will help this other building also achieve NZE. This multi-site approach broadens the perspective from a single building to the District’s entire inventory, encouraging an approach to citywide radical energy conservation.

Owner: Department of General Services; Associate Architect: Perkins Eastman Architects: Sean O’Donnell, Omar Calderon Santiago, Mary R. Rankin, Huyen Nguyen, Elyse Smith, Lina Taheri, Blair Davenport, Karen Gioconda, Juan Guarin, Heather Jauregui, Tanya Eagle; General Contractor: Gilbane Building Construction Company/Saxon Collaborative Construction Joint Venture; Landscape Architect: Natural Resources Design; Civil Engineer: Bowman Consulting; Structural Engineer: Yun Associates; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: CMTA; Copyright Joseph Romeo Courtesy Perkins Eastman; Plumbing and Fire Protection Engineer, Engenium Group; Sustainability, Perkins Eastman Architects; Acoustics, Polysonics; Low Voltage, Innovative Systems Design & Training, Inc.; Food Service, Nyikos-Garcia Food Service Design Inc.

2022 Honorable Mentions

Somerset Extension
Moseley Architects

 

Located in East Baltimore’s Gay Street Neighborhood, the Somerset Extension renovation transformed townhomes that spent years in decline into a safe, accessible, and active townhome community. Taking down block walls which surrounded the property and reconfiguring units that once faced inward creates inviting street access to the townhomes. Removing four buildings at the interior of the site allowed for the addition of a playground, green space, more secure parking for residents and guests, and a loop for policing.

Client: Woda Cooper Companies; Architect: Moseley Architects: Faith Hawks, Matthew Ormsby, Elizabeth Belcher, Avery Bowen, Lance Tarbell; General Contractor: Commercial Construction; Landscape Architect: Human and Rhode, Inc.; Civil Engineer: Gower Thompson; Structural Engineer: Skarda & Associates Inc.; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Henry Adams Consulting; Photographer: © Kevin Weber 2022; Energy Consultant: Pando Alliance.

2022 Honorable Mentions

Case Western Reserve University, Fribley Commons Dining Facility
Ayers Saint Gross

 

The renovation of Fribley Commons transforms a 1960s-era dining hall into a vibrant center of student life. The new design reveals and complements the building’s distinctive mid-century chevron roof with transparent volumes that highlight internal program activity and address the public streetscape. A new addition reconfigures and clarifies the main entrance and circulation to articulate a welcoming gateway to the university’s South Residential Village. The dining program is supplemented by visible student meeting and gathering spaces that animate the outdoor realm and contribute to a vital 24-hour campus hub.

Designed to support state-of-the art foodservice delivery and innovation, the new facility features distinct restaurant concepts that enable an inclusive range of dietary needs. These restaurants also function as flexible spaces for late night options and other programmatic events while a variety of furniture options promote gathering and comfortable places to socialize or study. The high-performance design supports sustainability in all aspects of campus dining operations, and encourages healthy life-long habits through nutrition education.

Owner: Case Western Reserve University; Architect: Ayers Saint Gross: Cooper Melton, Alice Brooks, Eric Zahn, Erin Estep, Stephen Pasquerello, Timothy Shook, Allison Wilson; Construction Administration: Van Auken Aikens Architects; General Contractor: AM Higley; Landscape Architect: REALM Collaborative; Civil & Structural Engineer: Osborn Engineering; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Karpinski Engineering; ©2021 Lauren K Davis / Feinknopf Photography; Food Service Design: Ricca Design Studios; Cost Estimator: PCS & Estimate, Inc.; Plumbing Engineering and Fire Protection: Sandhu and Associates.

2022 Honorable Mentions

College Park City Hall
Design Collective

 

The new City Hall was first contemplated as part of the Baltimore Avenue Corridor & Visioning Study by Design Collective in 2013. At the time, City Hall did not have frontage or visibility from Baltimore Avenue, hidden from view behind several one-story, small, commercial buildings under multiple ownership.

The city formed a partnership for the building with the University of Maryland and proceeded to acquire property that would allow development of the entire city block fronting on Baltimore Avenue which is the main street running between the city of College Park and the University of Maryland.

The partnership was formed with the intent of strengthening the ties between the two and developing a program that would be mutually beneficial to the City and University.

The challenge for the design team was to replace an outdated, inaccessible building with a new facility that would function better for its citizens, be reflective of the partnership and create a true heart for the city that is adaptable, equitable and accessible for everyone.

The design approach was to create an inclusive process for design by leading workshops with City and University leaders, students, citizens, and stakeholders to identify goals and establish guiding principles. The goal of the process was not only to establish these principles but also build trust and communication between these groups through open dialogue. The following guiding principles were established as an outcome:

The design team used these principles to inform both massing for the building and its organization on the site. The building is designed around an open plaza that is now the heart of College Park. It is a highly flexible space that can be used for programmed activities and events but also works as a passive gathering space with a variety of seating areas for groups or individuals as well as areas of sun and shade. A bio retention area adjoins the path to the building’s entry and collects water from both the plaza and building putting sustainability on display. The building’s interior spaces are organized around the plaza in a way that supports its highly functional and accessible goals.

This truly unique mixed-use civic building was purposeful in its invite and inclusion to be for all people. The result of this collaborative design process is a place for College Park and the University of Maryland that has seen increase programs and events for all people as well as an inviting center for the city.

Owner/Client: City of College Park, Maryland and the University of Maryland; Architect: Design Collective, Inc.: Scott Vieth, Matt Herbert, Jennifer McLaughlin, Brian Reetz, Tim Sullivan, Jennifer Heinz-Zahner, Michael Pullano, Meredith Sullivan, Rachel Federline, John Bernet, Mike McGrain, Jennifer Chorosevic; General Contractor: Davis Construction; Civil Engineer: A. Morton Thomas & Associates; Structural Engineer: A. Morton Thomas & Associates; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Henry Adams; Photographer: Tom Holdsworth Photography; The Lighting Practice; Koffel Associates; Sustainable Building Partners; Convergent Technologies Design Group.

2022 Honorable Mentions

AC Hotel Convention Center
Peter Fillat Architects

 

The AC Hotel Convention Center is a 13-story, 234 room hotel located a block away from the convention center and Mount Vernon Square in Washington, DC. The square site (100 x 100) is located on the corner of K Street and 6th Street, a busy intersection of North/South bound and East/West bound vehicles.

The building’s design concept is driven by this constant movement as well as the perfect geometry of the site. There is a building height limit of 130’, such that a perfect 100’ cube sitting on a 30’ base can be used as a starting off point. The cube is pushed and pulled according to court light and air, as well as alley access. The 30’ base creates a datum line which relates directly to the preserved row houses immediately to the West. This base is further articulated with bays relating to the human scale of the historic streetscape. This scale is then flipped at the corner with a perfect glass cube at the entrance.

The Manganese Ironspot Artisan B rick finish is used as the primary cladding material with the mortar joints raked horizontally. This creates a separation of the reflective surface as well as a scaler aspect to the façade. The reflective brick, along with the semi-reflective glazing reduces heat gain.

The recessed upper-level spaces, as well as the roof, have extensive living roof plantings for stormwater management. The building is pending LEED Gold Certification.

Developer: Douglas Development; Architect: Peter Fillat Architects: Peter Fillat – President & CEO, Manish Patel – Principal, Ariel Westmark – Associate; General Contractor: CBG Building Company; Civil Engineer: Dewberry; Structural Engineer: Tadjer-Cohen-Edelson Associates Inc.; Mechanical Engineer: Allen & Shariff Engineering, LLC; ©2020, Sam Oberter Photography, ©2020, John Ellis Photography; Consultant: Rodrigo Vargas Design; 

2022 Honorable Mentions

20th CBRNE Command Building 5046
Whitman Requardt & Associates LLP

 

The 20th CBRNE Command (Chemical, Biological, Nuclear and Explosives) was activated 16 October 2004 by U. S. Army Command and is an elite group that provides specialized CBNE response in support of military operations and civil authorities worldwide. This new brigade needed a new headquarters and operations center to accommodate over 700 personnel. Two existing adjacent buildings, 5046 and 5016 at Aberdeen Proving Ground, were available to house them to comply with funding that restricted the project to only renovation work. To assess how multiple buildings might be joined to accommodate the program, site surveys and technical evaluation of existing conditions were conducted. This process determined that the reuse of the two, though not ideal, could be achieved. The challenge was to sustainably adapt one story, early 1980’s warehouses into a facility that provided state-of- the-art technologies with program spaces tailored to their needs. The building analysis, in tandem with the programming study, determined which portions of existing structures could best be retained and/or modified to support the new program. Both buildings had to be developed as a seamless, signature entity, and are designed to be LEED Silver certified.

Clients: USACE, 2 Hopkins Plaza; Architect: WRA: PM: Michael Miskimon, AIA Team: Eric Beard-Sackett, AIA; Frederick Hiser, AIA; Michael Henry, Nhac Le; General Contractor: Whiting+Turner; Landscape Architect: Mahan Rykiel Associates (Ken Schmidt, LA); Civil Engineer: WRA (John Householder, PE); Structural Engineer: WRA (Mike Barnhart, PE; Bill Young, PE); Mechanical Engineer: WRA (George Gregory, PE); Electrical Engineer: WRA (Ralph Lewis, PE); Photographer: 2021 KC Photography LLC; Sustainability: WRA, Rudy Schaar, AIA (Deceased); Interiors: WRA, Corice Singletary, NCIDQ; Fire Protection: WRA, Eric Hunsicker, PE; Plumbing: WRA, Aaron Mullinax, PE; Telecom: WRA, David Alkins, PE; ATFP/ESS: WRA, Christa Decker, PE; Graphics: Monty Howard, WMHCD LLC.

2022 AIA Baltimore Residential Design Award

House in a Clearing
McInturff Architects

 

 

This is a live/work house for a highly particular program and location. On a gently sloping clearing in a forest, the house is intended as a filter through which the site flows, unimpeded, while the orientation controls the seasonal sun entering the glassy, transparent structure.

Facing the east and west sides of the property, solid masonry walls bookend the body of the house. The long facades facing the slope are glass, placing the occupants on a platform open above and below to the woods beyond. The south face is pushed toward the tree line, providing full shading from summer sun while admitting the low rays of winter. The north face needs no shading as it opens to the long views into the meadow and trees beyond.

The main open space — living, dining, kitchen and workspaces, pared down to only what is essential — occupy one end of the platform while a bedroom and gym occupy the other.

Separating the two is a masonry core containing bathrooms, stairs and mechanical spaces, as well as two flexible-use small wood-lined rooms on a minimal second floor.

All materials have been chosen for their authenticity and longevity; steel, wood, concrete, concrete masonry and glass are the only materials used inside and out. There is no drywall and there is virtually no paint.

The result is a home full of nature and natural light, mixing work and life with no commute in a simple, clear, minimal style.

Owner: Adam & Liz Gerber; Architect: McInturff Architects: Mark McInturff FAIA, Jeffrey McInturff; General Contractor: Design Alternatives, Inc.; Structural Engineer: Robert Neubauer PE / Neubauer Consulting Engineers; ©Julia Heine Photography.

 

2022 AIA Baltimore Residential Design Honorable Mention

Baltimore City View
Carballo Architecture

 

 

Nestled between a historic district and a modern, luxury neighborhood, this new construction, single family home juxtaposes with Baltimore City’s past and highlights its progress. Not your average Baltimore City row home, this home is 29 feet wide and built on two consolidated lots.

The home, Baltimore City View, has three stories, plus a penthouse. It offers an oversized two car garage, open living spaces with white oak floors, modern light fixtures, a gas fireplace, a quartz waterfall island and an office nook, which is great for today’s world of remote working. The modern kitchen features frameless cabinets, voice-activated faucet and black stainless appliances. The custom open steel staircase with steel railings, white oak treads and large windows on the stair landings creates a breath-taking light tower.

Given the location of the property, the house was designed to take full advantage of the views and natural light. With oversized aluminum clad, black, energy efficient casement and fixed windows and a large roof deck, the home offers unobstructed views to the historic Domino Sugar sign, Harbor East and the Inner Harbor. The exterior, which takes inspiration from the area’s historic past of industries, fisheries, and canneries, is clad in corrugated metal siding, with an eye-catching orange front door.

It is an excellent blend of new and old within the historic context of Fells Point, showing how far we’ve come and possibilities for the city’s future.

Owner: Jeff Rogers; Architect: Carballo Architecture: Adam Carballo & Neal Curtis; Photographer: Rogers Realty LLC.

2022 AIA Baltimore Social Equity Award

Somerset Extension
Moseley Architects

 

Located in East Baltimore’s Gay Street Neighborhood, the Somerset Extension renovation transformed townhomes that spent years in decline into a safe, accessible, and active townhome community. Taking down block walls which surrounded the property and reconfiguring units that once faced inward creates inviting street access to the townhomes. Removing four buildings at the interior of the site allowed for the addition of a playground, green space, more secure parking for residents and guests, and a loop for policing.

Client: Woda Cooper Companies; Architect: Moseley Architects: Faith Hawks, Matthew Ormsby, Elizabeth Belcher, Avery Bowen, Lance Tarbell; General Contractor: Commercial Construction; Landscape Architect: Human and Rhode, Inc.; Civil Engineer: Gower Thompson; Structural Engineer: Skarda & Associates Inc.; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Henry Adams Consulting; Photographer: © Kevin Weber 2022; Energy Consultant: Pando Alliance.

2022 AIA Baltimore Good Design = Good Business Award

Berks Nature The Rookery
GWWO, Inc.

 

Established in 1974, Berks Nature is the leading agent for environmental conservation in Berks County, Pennsylvania, offering leadership, direct action, expertise, land use planning, advocacy, research, and education programs in accordance with the natural, historic, social, economic, and technical needs of the region and local community.

Originally located in downtown Reading, Berks Nature sought to move its headquarters to Angelica Park, an urban community park, to allow the organization to fulfill its mission and embody the belief that nature is essential to our quality of life. Opening in 2017, the LEED Gold certified Nature Place was designed as a working example of conservation principles. Sited adjacent to an existing classroom building, orientation of the structure celebrates the environment, providing panoramic views of the surrounding wetlands, making a visual connection with the nearby Neversink Mountain, and maximizing daylighting. The new facility—complete with classrooms, conference rooms, offices, outdoor learning spaces, and nature play area—allowed the conservation organization to dramatically expand its programming and open a new nature preschool, which significantly increased regional awareness. By 2019, Berks Nature’s Eco-Camps—a mainstay of the organization—reached capacity and spatial constraints combined with inclement weather limited student field trips.

To welcome every child interested in nature, a new addition constructed over and adjacent to the original preschool building doubled the size of the existing campus while limiting site disturbance and preserving the pristine natural setting. Clad in reclaimed wood from Pennsylvania mushroom farms, the addition blends in and appears as a natural extension of the existing facility. Named the Rookery—a term for a colony of birds—the addition provides uniquely stunning views over the 100-acre park and features a new multipurpose room suitable for use as a classroom and community gathering and event space linked to a covered outdoor rooftop classroom by an operable glass wall. Below, a new breezeway, complete with wood-burning fireplace, overlooks the wetlands and provides additional flexible program space.

Designed to showcase sustainable principles that visitors can implement in their own homes, the addition features bird-friendly acid etched glazing, rain chains, rain barrels, sheep’s wool insulation, reclaimed and recycled materials, and daylight sensors. Interpretive signage and wall graphics located throughout help educate visitors on the site’s ecosystem and conservation principles. The new facility has allowed Berks Nature to increase and diversity its educational programming and enhance its service to the community.

Owner: Berks Nature; Architect: GWWO, Inc: Terry Squyres, AIA, LEED AP; Kate Scurlock, AIA; Kimmie Kim, Anthony McAllister, Kevin Miller; General Contractor: Burkey Corporation; Civil Engineer: Barry Isett & Associates; Structural Engineer: Ewing Cole; Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Henry Adams; Tom Holdsworth Photography.

2022 AIA Baltimore Good Design = Good Business, Honorable Mention

Barcoding, Inc.
Urban Design Group

 

Located in the Highlandtown neighborhood of Baltimore City at 3840 Bank Street, long sat an aging 1920’s industrial warehouse, originally built and used as a textile manufacturing and distribution hub.

Situated amid dense residential blocks to the west and an under-utilized industrial area to the east, the site provided an opportunity to merge the two while establishing the edge between the starkly different districts.

The primary challenge of 3840 Bank Street was the meticulous rehabilitation of the 1920’s warehouse structure, and converting it into a technological hub for Barcoding Inc. The company, a fast-growing supply chain innovation outfit requiring space for office suites and production, serves as a contemporary equivalent in many ways to the original occupants of the property, infusing creativity, manufacturing, and jobs into the building and the community at-large.

The design and execution of the Barcoding, Inc. Headquarters at 3840 Bank Street presents a prototype of revitalizing an under-utilized space as an innovative and collaborative environment for the contemporary workforce.

Materiality and tectonic detailing elevates the activity of construction to art-form in an effort to respect the surrounding architecture and the history of the space. The restoration efforts remained true to material and dedicated to enhancing the existing beauty of the 1920’s warehouse.

A simple parti utilizes a transparent band of private offices to bisect the space while maintaining visual connectivity. This simple parti offers an adaptable and transformative space. A multi-faceted and comprehensive approach to sustainability encompasses restoration and rehabilitation, proximity and connectivity to social infrastructure, responsiveness of form to the natural environment, and reuse of existing materials.

Client: Bank Street Partners, LLC.; Architect: Urban Design Group: Michael Burton, Ryan Jacobson; General Contractor: Smartbox Construction; Crystal Micriotti Photography.

FAR Student Award Winners

1st Place: Graduate Design Award
Joseph Edwards and Marcelino Defngin, the University of Maryland for “Stack Alley”

1st Place: Undergraduate Design Award
Meredith Eby, the University of Maryland for “Dwelling in the City”

2021 Excellence in Design Awards FAR Jury 
Lauren Meister, Asooc. AIA
Melonee Quintanilla

2022 Excellence in Design Awards East Bay, California Jury

Laura Hartman, FAIA (Jury Chair)
Ursula Currie, AIA
Susi Marzuola, AIA, LEED AP BD+C
Mark Steppman, AIA
Rob Zirkle, AIA

2022 Excellence in Design Awards Residential Design Jury

Delbert Adams
Martin Marren, AIA
Brittany Williams, AIA

2022 Excellence in Design Awards Good Design=Good Business Jury

Lauren Hamilton
Dominic Wiker, LEED AP
Frank Fantauzzi

2021 Social Equity Design Award Jury

Caitlin O’Hara
Lawanda Williams, MPH, LCSW-C
Tamir Ezzat, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP BD+C